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A Guide To Ascot Racecourse

Published on June 17, 2017 by Tim @ Betting Gods

Ascot is now home to three of the world’s most lucrative flat-racing meetings, the 5-day Royal Ascot Meeting which takes place in June, the King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Stakes Meeting in July, and the Qipco British Champions Day which takes place in October.

Royal Ascot is the pinnacle of flat-racing meetings in the UK, and it’s a chance for crowds to marvel at precocious two-year-olds in races like the Queen Mary Stakes and the Coventry Stakes, and see the speediest of sprinters in the 5-furlong King’s Stand Stakes. There’s also prestigious handicaps like the Royal Hunt Cup, The Britannia and the Wokingham Stakes, and Group 1 mile and middle-distance action in the Queen Anne Stakes and the Prince of Wales’s Stakes. However, none of these races carry the prestige of the Ascot Gold Cup.

Ascot also plays host to several high-profile Jumps Races, including November’s Ascot Hurdle Fixture, the Long Walk Hurdle in December, the Clarence House Chase in January, and the Ascot Chase in February.

Course Guides

There are two flat-courses at Ascot, the Round Course and the Old Mile Course. The Round Course measures 14-furlongs, and turns right-handed before horses enter the 2½ furlong straight. Meanwhile, the Old Mile Course is a straight-mile, which links with the round course when it reaches the famous Swinley Bottom. Galloping in nature, the track has a relatively short run-in that means horses ridden prominently can be at a huge advantage in races where the front-runners haven’t gone too fast and set it up for horses coming from off the pace. However, the straight-mile is wide enough for all horses to have a fair chance, providing the weather hasn’t caused any bias to one side of the track.

The National Hunt Course is also right-handed, and trainers with horses who like decent ground tend to target the Ascot Meetings, as excellent drainage means the ground seldom rides as soft as the going description. Meanwhile, the fences are stiff, and front-runners who jumps well are often hard to pass.

Top Flat Trainers And Jockeys

John Gosden and Ryan Moore are numerically the best trainer and jockey to follow, though neither would have made you a level-stakes profit over the last 3 seasons. However, one trainer to always consider is Aidan O’Brien, whose 16 winners from 84 runners have produced a profit of £37.45. Jockeys to follow are harder to find, with only Adam Kirby and Silvestre de Sousa being the only high-profile jockeys to return small profits.

Top Jumps Trainers And Jockeys

Over fences, Paul Nicholls is the top Ascot trainer numerically, and his 14 winners from 52 runners also returned a profit of £9.23. However, that was bettered by Charlie Longsdon and Gary Moore. Venetia Williams is undoubtedly the trainer to follow in this sphere though as she has returned the best level-stakes profit of £24.50. Meanwhile, Harry Fry has proved the trainer to follow over hurdles with 10 winners from 22 runners producing a level-stakes profit of £23.43

Aidan Coleman is the undisputed king of the level-stakes profit in the jockeys table, with his 12 winners from 66 rides returning a profit of £39.75, whilst a name to watch over fences is Jack Sherwood – who has ridden 4 winners from 6 rides so far in his short career.

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